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The Torah Learning Library of Yeshivat Chovevei Torah

Category: Halakha & Modernity

What Endangers the World of Torah and The Rabbinate?

by Rabbi Nathaniel HelfgotPosted on July 22, 2016

מה מסכן את עולם התורה ואת הרבנות? By Rav Yoel Bin Nun Rav Yoel Bin Nun is the former rosh yeshiva of Yeshivat Kibbutz Hadati and a founding faculty member of Michlelet Herzog of Yeshivat Har Etzion, and a faculty member at Yeshivat Har Etzion and other Torah institutions.…

Unequal Justice? – Does Halakha Tolerate Unethical Behavior Towards the Other? Part 4: Halakhic Strategies for Minimizing the Distinctions and Darkhei Shalom

by Rabbi Dov LinzerPosted on July 20, 2016

Introduction In Part I of this series we explored areas where the halakha – as articulated in the Talmud – has made distinctions between our obligation to Jews and our obligation to Gentiles.  The following chart is based on a similar chart which appeared at the end of Part I.  …

Unequal Justice? – Does Halakha Tolerate Unethical Behavior Towards the Other? Part 3: Acts Against Person

by Rabbi Dov LinzerPosted on July 20, 2016

Key points In our discussion of distinctions in the area of acts against person, pay attention to the following key points as we work through our sources: Biblical terms – are there any limiting words such as achikha, rei’echa or amitcha in the verses dealing with injury and murder?…

Unequal Justice? – Does Halakha Tolerate Unethical Behavior Towards the Other? Part 2: Acts Against Property

by Rabbi Dov LinzerPosted on July 20, 2016

Key points In our discussion of distinctions in the area of acts against property, pay attention to the following key points as we work through our sources: Biblical terms – amitcha and rei’echa are the key terms that are used in this area of law.  …

Unequal Justice? – Does Halakha Tolerate Unethical Behavior Towards the Other? Part 1: Acts of Financial Aid and Assistance

by Rabbi Dov LinzerPosted on July 14, 2016

Introduction – Three Categories of Distinctions In halakha, many distinctions can be found between the treatment of Jews and Gentiles.  The point here is not in regards to ritual matters, such as marriage, or food, or houses of worship, but in regards to what we would call in a secular context civil and criminal law.  …

On The Mitzvot of Non-Jews: An Analysis of Avodah Zarah 2B-3A

by Rabbi Dov LinzerPosted on July 5, 2016

Non-Jews are commanded to observe the seven Noahide laws. A logical corollary of this is that they are to be rewarded for their performance of these mitzvot, and held liable for transgressing them. This assumption, however, is brought into question by the sugyah around the statement of Rav Yosef in Avodah Zara 2B-3A (paralleled in Bava Kama 35a)… This article was originally published in the Milin Havivin, Vol 1.…

Ani LiDodi, VDodi Li: Towards a More Balanced Wedding Ceremony

by Rabbi Dov LinzerPosted on July 5, 2016

This article was originally published on My Jewish Learning. In the traditional wedding ceremony, men play a more prominent role than women. This can be troubling for couples who, while wishing to be respectful of tradition and community, are also looking for ways to have a ceremony that reflects their vision of marriage as an equal partnership.…

Shavuot: Chag v’Chesed

by Rabbi Dov LinzerPosted on July 5, 2016

The holiday of Shavuot is generally assumed to commemorate the giving of the Torah, which occurred on the sixth of Sivan. In the Torah, however, Shavuot is only described as an agricultural holiday and occurs not on any particular calendrical date, but at the culmination of seven weeks from the beginning of the harvest season that occurs on the second day of Pesach.…

Psychotherapy and Teshuvah: Parallel and Overlapping Systems for Change

by Michelle Friedman, MDPosted on July 5, 2016

People come to mental health treatment because they are in pain. The presentations of their pain vary–they come because they suffer from symptoms that restrict or threaten their lives, because they struggle with inner conflicts that undermine and torment their integrity, or because if they don’t come, they will lose their job, their spouse, or their children.…

Shame and Illness: A Jewish Perspective

by Michelle Friedman, MDPosted on July 5, 2016

I approach the topic of “Shame and Illness” from my twin perspectives as psychoanalyst and traditional Jew. This written piece contains material prepared for the forum held at New York Medical College on June 14, 2004 as well as issues raised that evening via case vignette presentation and audience participation.…

Sex Selection and Halakhic Ethics: A Contemporary Discussion

by Michelle Friedman, MDPosted on July 5, 2016

This originally appeared in Tradition in 2007. To read the article, click here.…

History of Past Sexual Abuse in Married Observant Women

by Michelle Friedman, MDPosted on July 5, 2016

Most studies investigating religiosity and sexual abuse have examined whether religiosity ameliorates the negative consequences of sexual trauma (1–4), rather than whether religiosity affects the occurrence of sexual trauma. There are currently no statistics regarding the lifetime prevalence of sexual abuse within religious communities.…